Author Topic: chainplates inspection  (Read 6943 times)

Dave Newstead

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chainplates inspection
« on: May 14, 2014, 08:20:10 AM »
New owner planning offshore passage on my CSY 45 WO.  Should I visually inspect chainplates?

Soggy Geek

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chainplates inspection
« Reply #1 on: May 14, 2014, 06:52:22 PM »
Hi David, you should ALWAYS visually inspect your rig before any major passage, and at least once or twice a "sailing season" if you're just poking around inshore waters.  You never know when you might get caught in an unexpected wind with too much sail up.

If you can find out from the Previous Owner, you should find out if, when, and what parts of the rig have been previously replaced.  If you have original CSY rigging/chainplates, your boat is a disaster waiting to happen.

And, quite frankly, just visually inspecting the chainplates cannot tell you what kind of "crevice corrosion" you might have on the side of the chainplates that is not visible to you.

Don't stop at the chainplates, however.  Every metal fitting on the rig, is susceptible to fatigue and cracking.  We had replaced everything on the rig but the "toggles" and "tangs", and have had two break open, up the mast (these are the u-shaped things that connect your rigging to the mast".

If your rigging is of unknown age, you should hire an experienced rigger to look it over (and "tune" the rig) ASAP (and have him teach you what he is looking at, and doing).  And consider just replacing it all for peace of mind (and personal/boat safety).  Not necessarily before this passage, but as soon as practical, especially if your plan is to go offshore much.

A dismasting is unpleasant, and possibly dangerous, even in protected waters.  But offshore, it can be life-threatening, and even if you can get your boat to a harbor, trying to re-rig in a foreign port is expensive and time-consuming.

Hopefully your PO will tell you "I re-rigged the whole boat 5 years ago", then you just need to keep inspecting (and verify he did the tangs and toggles too).

Good luck
Sherry
In Palau, western Pacific for a few months
http://svsoggypaws.blogspot.com
Soggy Paws the CSY has been sold but not forgotten!
http://svsoggypaws.com/CSY/

Jules Shockley

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chainplates inspection
« Reply #2 on: May 14, 2014, 07:51:41 PM »
This a reason to check your chain



plates!

Jules Shockley

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chainplates inspection
« Reply #3 on: May 14, 2014, 07:57:25 PM »
The pictures didn't come through. Don't know why, but trust me. On a CSY, CHECK THE CHAIN PLATES!
Jules

Jules Shockley

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chainplates inspection
« Reply #4 on: May 17, 2014, 09:13:22 AM »
Maybe the pictures will come through as a zip file

Chip

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chainplates inspection
« Reply #5 on: May 17, 2014, 12:19:26 PM »
The first and most obvious sign of trouble with my chainplates was the bolts holding them. The nut crumbled when I tried to tighten it with very little pressure. Tap any stainless hardware you can see with a wrench or hammer periodically if you don't know when it was installed. If anything cracks or crumbles, it is time to replace the lot.

Bill Bischoff

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chainplates inspection
« Reply #6 on: May 29, 2014, 11:51:12 AM »
I don't know if anyone else encountered problems trying to inspect their chainplates on a 44 WO, but I sure did.  Access is VERY limited, as the chainplates were installed prior to the decks being fitted.  

I ended up removing all of mine and replacing them with the external round plates, which are always a source of compliments from other sailors :).

I do have a full set of original chainplates that are apparently in fine shape.  No obvious corrosion, cracks, etc.  If someone wants these they can have them for $120 plus shipping.

Cheers, Bill
Odyssey, 1979 44 WO
Lying La Paz, BCS

Keith O

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chainplates inspection
« Reply #7 on: June 03, 2014, 12:18:16 PM »
Hi Bill,
Are the chainplates common to those on the 33'?  If so, I'll have them.

Mike Zofchak

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chainplates inspection
« Reply #8 on: June 13, 2014, 11:16:12 AM »
Chain plate info needed from those of you that have been there. I started removing the nuts from the chain plate bolts and a few of them are spinning. A couple of questions I need answered before I go tearing into these.

•   Are the bottom bolts at the top of the rub rail or are they buried into it?
•   Are the top bolts behind the teak trim that is located under the cap rail?
•   It appears that they are put on with the dreaded 5200. Any thoughts?
•   Recommendations on fabricator for the new chain plates?

Thanks,
Mike Z.
Capt. Mike Zofchak
Land Locked S/V Buckeye Queen

Peter Roach

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chainplates inspection
« Reply #9 on: June 13, 2014, 02:43:09 PM »
You can remove 5200 by using a vibrating cutter (I got mine from Harbor Freight). You sharpen the putty knife blade on all side. THIS IS THE IMPORTANT PART - spray the area with water before you start and while you are cutting the 5200. It allows the blade to slide instead of bite.

If you want to remove thru hulls with 5200 you heat them up with a torch and when the 5200 gets soft you push them out. Some will drop out if you get them hot enough. Be careful with the fiberglass.
I tried having a bad day once but I did not like it

Jules Shockley

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chainplates inspection
« Reply #10 on: June 13, 2014, 07:46:14 PM »
There is a product called DeBond, a spray which will dissolve 5200. I have had very good results.
I removed my chain plates from the inside. The nuts were the nylon locktite variety. I used a heat gun to melt the nylon and they were easily removed without going through the rubrail.
Jules

Bill Bischoff

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chainplates inspection
« Reply #11 on: June 15, 2014, 11:00:32 AM »
Hi Keith,

send me your email and I'll send some pictures.  I'm not sure if they are the same on the 33.

Bill  whiteyfishatcharter.net
Odyssey, 1979 44 WO
Lying La Paz, BCS

MY TIME

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chainplates inspection
« Reply #12 on: June 15, 2014, 12:27:58 PM »
Mike, to answer your questions.

Yes the bottom bolts are buried in the rub rail. The bronze rub rail has to be removed. The slot head bolt is behind about 1.5 inch of a polyester filler that I broke out with hammer and wood chisel.

Yes the top bolt is behind the teak side trim to the teak cap. I removed all the teak cap and side trim on mine to replace with something less labor intensive.

As far as being put on with 5200 maybe. I pryed mine off with a couple of crow foot pry bars. Not really that much trouble. I have found that heat works best for removing parts mounted with 5200. Small propane torch or MAP gas works well.

As far as fabricator call around find a shop with a water jet cutter that will cut from your drawings.
I found one that would cut for 55.00 a hour. Download the drawing files from drop box and carry those in. Order your stainless online and have it delivered to the shop and you dont even have to touch it.

Donald Stengel

Mike Zofchak

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« Reply #13 on: June 16, 2014, 09:11:16 AM »
Thanks a bunch guys, as always there is a wealth of info here. Peter I love my vibrating cutter (yes from Harbor Freight also) I have used it a ton of times and I really like your idea to use water. Thanks Donald on the bolt info, that what I was afraid of with the bottom bolts. My boat is covered with shrink wrap now and I am trying to get one more winter out of the cover so I will have to wait to cut where the rub rail is. The shrink wrap is designed so that I have easy access and it makes a wonderful work shop! I have plenty of other things to do so the chainplates can wait. In fact I just found considerable rot on the bottom of the bulkhead behind the galley. So out comes the galley and time to rebuild the bulkhead.

I still love my boat though!!!!!

Mike Z.
Capt. Mike Zofchak
Land Locked S/V Buckeye Queen

Jules Shockley

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chainplates inspection
« Reply #14 on: June 21, 2014, 08:17:45 AM »
Bill,
I moved my chain plates outside of the hull and glassed in the holes. I'm pleased with the result.
I made several posts, detailing the work, probably a year ago. Check the archives and you might find something useful.