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Messages - Soggy Paws

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1
Systems / Re: Lightening grounding strip mounting flush or with a gap?
« on: September 27, 2017, 01:58:19 PM »
It has been a long time since I did that installation and we have sold the boat.  As I recall the literature recommended leaving about a 1/2" gap between the hull and copper bar so that as the strike dissipates along the edge it won't damage the hull so much.  So I used small squares of Starboard with holes in the center for the bronze mounting bolts.  The rest is as described in the writeup.

A lightning strike is a really scary thing and who knows how much this will help.  But it made me feel better about it.

Dave

2
Systems / Re: 44 WT blower for frig and engine and battery exhaust
« on: September 16, 2017, 12:54:55 PM »
I owned WT 35 Soggy Paws for 20 years.
 
I cut 4" vent holes in the outside of the cockpit combing as you are contemplating- port side for the engine room vent blower and starboard side for the galley vent blower over the stove.  If you use the type of vent hole covers that also have a plate that will keep out rain and ocean spray you can use that when needed.   The vent blowers make a lot of noise so you won't want to run them for long unless the engine is running.
 
Mounting the refrig systems above the refrig boxes is a bad idea both from a heat standpoint but also access is difficult.  How about moving them down to under the small seat just inside of the aft cabin?  I installed my refrig compressor there and vented it with a muffin fan out the inboard wall.

You should also consider moving your batteries out of the engine room.  Heat when the engine is charging the batteries is a battery killer.  I split my house bank, one set under the nav table and the other in place of the trash bin.

For the refrig systems an option would be to use large quieter muffin fans to remove heat from the Danfoss compressors.  If you are running them at full speed the literature says you must do that.  The permanent fix is  is a Frigoboat keel cooler system.

Finally, if you are going to be cruising in the tropics I recommend using only solar as an alternate energy source, no wind.  650 watts is enough to recharge to 100% on a daily basis 98% of the time.

See my notes on these issues on our website SVSoggypaws.com/Workshop

Dave

3
Interior / Re: Port Light - Dogs
« on: May 26, 2017, 07:40:06 PM »
Peter,

Long ago I bought several to replace some of mine on Soggy Paws at Don's Salvage in Clearwater, FL.  They are all SS and don't quite look like the originals but they fit with a SS wingnut.  They were a couple of dollars each and he had a box full.

Dave

4
Systems / Re: Cutlass Bearing Replacement
« on: April 23, 2017, 08:00:01 PM »
Roger,

This is from a much earlier post to someone else.  We did not need to remove the rudder just the prop.  Use a puller not a big  hammer to remove the prop!

If your WT hull number is close to ours, #35, then our construction should be exactly the same in that area.  The fglas stern tubes are all made separately and of the same dimensions.   The factory installed the stern tube and most boats still have the original.  They are available and replaceable, though maybe a bigger job than you are contemplating.  Ours (and yours), according to the plans, should be flush with the aft end of the short stub keel area that holds the shaft and cutlass bearing.

Your cutlass bearing has probably been changed multiple times since original.  Whoever installs the cutlass bearing determines whether or not it protrudes and how much.  However, there is a compromise to be made here.  Less is probably better as anything sticking out will not be supported, but no protrusion also makes it more difficult to remove the bearing.  You certainly would not want to leave it out more than an inch.  I found and have continued to leave ours sticking out about 5/8", just enough to grab with a pipe wrench. 

There are several ways to install the cutlass, some easier to remove than others.  The first time I removed mine in 1999 it took me over 2 hours to get it out with a pipe wrench and a lot of twisting.  Maybe it could have been done faster with a fine saw blade, but that also seemed like a lot of work.

Since then I have used the following method from a pro installer from CA:
-Thoroughly clean the inside of the stern tube's aft 6" of all foreign material and ensure it is round and smooth.
-Carefully hand sand the new cutlass bearing until it is a snug fit, not tight or loose.  This shouldn't take more than 15 minutes or something might be wrong with the tube or bearing.
-Coat the outside of the BEARING ONLY with Marine Silicone and slide it into the stern tube until about 5/8" proud.  Twist the bearing 1/4 turn.
-Let the Silicone set overnight.
-Reinstall the set screws by dimpling the bearing from outside, being careful not to damage the fiberglass threads.  I use 1/4" Pan Head machine screws.  If you have none, take the time to install them.
-Consider installing a clam scoop to lubricate the bearing through one side of the stern tube if you have none.  It will significantly increase the life of the cutlass bearing.
-I've had no problems with this arrangement during 14 years of use, and can remove the old bearing in less than 5 minutes with an easy twist with a pipe wrench.  It now takes longer to remove the set screws than the bearing.  Once you start the twist the silicone's slipperyness facilitates the bearing's removal.
-For a bearing's long life it is important that it have good water lubrication, proper shaft alignment and the protruding shaft be no longer than 6" from stern tube to front of the prop hub.  Mine is still tight now on the shaft after 7 years.  Prior to this last installation, I made all three of the above mistakes, causing premature bearing failure.

Hope this helps.

Dave

5
Systems / Re: Refridgeration
« on: February 25, 2017, 07:33:35 AM »
Jules.
We find that for long term overseas cruising 3-4 cuft of freezer and 8-11 cuft of refrig are about right.  We like fresh veggies, cold drinks and a place to keep fresh meat/fish long term.  We much prefer a side loading refrig for its convenience and quick food extraction.  You can't change that.
I am not familiar enough with the 44WO to know where is best for the compressor.  Just don't put it in the engine room and make sure you have good ventilation.

Dave

6
Systems / Re: Refridgeration
« on: February 22, 2017, 06:49:54 PM »
Jules,

What boat do you have?
 
The keel cooler needs to be within 5' of the compressor and you want the compressor in a well ventilated space where you can have a small muffin fan run across the top of the compressor.  I mounted a muffin fan on top of the electronic control unit next to the compressor with velcro.  From there it blows across the top of the compressor and removes excess compressor heat.

On the 44 walkthru I mounted the compressor for the refrig in the aft cabin under the small seat in the fwd stbd corner of the room.  It already has a wooden vent screen.

I built the freezer under the main cabin table so it may be different from yours.

Dave

7
Systems / Re: Refridgeration
« on: February 21, 2017, 07:28:25 PM »
Jules,

A couple of other quick notes:

It would be worth your time to read Nigel Calder's 3 edition Mech and Elec Manual section on refrigeration.  It will give you great detail and help on making decisions on equipment and installation.  Look especially at his testing of various insulation materials.  I took his advice and used extruded polystyrene (blue or pink board) on my freezer on the CSY and now refrig on the cat.  Hard to beat R value of 6.5 and no water absorption.

Don't stress too much about drilling the 1.5 inch keel cooler hole in your hull.  The keel cooler you install is stronger than any hull, has no valve to leak, and if done carefully you will have no problems and a big amp benefit.

If you are considering the Isotherm equivalent, it works, but is less efficient because it is in enclosed space and needs some boat motion to get rid of the heat.  See Calder and others on this. 

We found that the Frigoboat keel cooler can also work if on low speed while on the hard if you drip some water on it over a rag.  We have used that method for months on the hard here in the Philippines with no problem.

Dave

8
Systems / Re: Refridgeration
« on: February 18, 2017, 08:56:27 PM »
Jules,

I'm not sure why someone would consider cycling on and off a negative.  Unless it is right in your ear you can't hear the compressor anyway.  A little muffin cooling fan makes more noise than the compressor! By constantly cycling like your home refrig, it can keep the box temp within about 2 degrees.  It does not harm the compressor.  A big reciprocating compressor could not do that. 

You are right about the holding plate negative.  They have a big box temp swing.  Mine saw about 15 degrees while holding over about 8 hours.  And that was with proper R20 insulation for the refrig and R30 for the freezer.  There are many other negatives for holding plates vs evaporator plates too so research carefully.  Just remember that not everything you hear or read is true.  The competition among refrig salesmen is intense.

Once you figure out your box sizes and insulation R value, Frigoboat has an excellent section on their website that will help you size an efficient compressor and evaporator plate.  A little bigger than calculated will be better as it will allow you to run the compressor at its lowest speed giving up to 30% more amp efficient system compared to running the compressor at high speed.  My new Danfoss based system used exactly the same amp hours the old holding plate system did and that was what the Frigoboat literature said it would use.  With two separate BD50 systems running at low speed cooling an 11 cuft side loading refrig and a 3 cu ft top loading freezer we used about 80 ahrs on a daily basis in the tropics.  Just make sure your insulation is right and door gaskets are tight.

If you want better efficiency over an air or water cooled system consider the keel cooler system which is what we are using.  The big benefit is saving about 15 amps a day over the others.  This system has no big cooling fan or water pump run heat exchanger.

Dave


Dave

Dave

9
Systems / Re: Refridgeration
« on: February 18, 2017, 09:11:15 AM »
Jules,

I have spent a lot of time and money on refrigeration over the past 20 years.  I think we finally got it right a few years back when we switched from a Tecumseh compressor/holding plate system to the more modern Frigoboat Danfoss compressor/evaporator plate system.  Compared to the old holding plate systems, the new systems are so much better and aren't expensive--about $1500 US for a good system like ours.  I would never go back or use a holding plate system again.  See some of our notes at:

http://www.svsoggypaws.com/frigoboat_installation.htm
http://svsoggypaws.blogspot.com/search/label/Frigoboat

We are now on the new cat and have installed the same Frigoboat keel cooler system in our recently built 8 cu ft refrigerator box.  It is light weight, quiet, very energy efficient, holds temp within 2 degrees and highly recommended by not only me but also Steve Dashew and Nigel Calder.  It works the way a good refrig should.

 Dave

10
Engines and Drive Train / Re: Prop shaft pulled?
« on: January 01, 2017, 07:34:38 PM »
Doug, the below info is from an earlier post that appears to have been lost since we were using Topica for this forum.  I'm including it in its entirety because it includes other useful information.  Hope it is useful to you.

The most difficult part of pulling your shaft is removing the tmission/shaft flange and prop.  If you don't have a prop puller you should get one.  Once done with those and loosening the stuffing box the shaft should pull right out.  If your shaft has been scored by the stuffing you might be able to cut a small bit off the forward end in order to reposition the scored part outside the stuffing box.  It would also be worthwhile to check the balance of the prop while it is off.


The construction of the 44s should be the same in the shaft area.  The fglas stern tubes are all made separately and of the same dimensions.   The factory installed the stern tube and most boats still have the original.  They are available and replaceable, though maybe a bigger job than you are contemplating.  Ours (and yours), according to the plans, should be flush with the aft end of the short stub keel area that holds the shaft and cutlass bearing.

Your cutlass bearing has probably been changed multiple times since original.  Whoever installs the cutlass bearing determines whether or not it protrudes and how much.  However, there is a compromise to be made here.  Less is probably better as anything sticking out will not be supported, but no protrusion also makes it more difficult to remove the bearing.  You certainly would not want to leave it out more than an inch.  I found and have continued to leave ours sticking out about 5/8", just enough to grab with a pipe wrench. 

There are several ways to install the cutlass, some easier to remove than others.  The first time I removed mine in 1999 it took me over 2 hours to get it out with a pipe wrench and a lot of twisting.  Maybe it could have been done faster with a fine saw blade, but that also seemed like a lot of work.

Since then I have used the following method from a pro installer from CA:
-Thoroughly clean the inside of the stern tube's aft 6" of all foreign material and ensure it is round and smooth.
-Carefully hand sand the new cutlass bearing until it is a snug fit, not tight or loose.  This shouldn't take more than 15 minutes or something might be wrong with the tube or bearing.
-Coat the outside of the BEARING ONLY with Marine Silicone and slide it into the stern tube until about 5/8" proud.  Twist the bearing 1/4 turn.
-Let the Silicone set overnight.
-Reinstall the set screws by dimpling the bearing from outside, being careful not to damage the fiberglass threads.  I use 1/4" Pan Head machine screws.  If you have none, take the time to install them.
-Consider installing a clam scoop to lubricate the bearing through one side of the stern tube if you have none.  It will significantly increase the life of the cutlass bearing.
-I've had no problems with this arrangement during 14 years of use, and can remove the old bearing in less than 5 minutes with an easy twist with a pipe wrench.  It now takes longer to remove the set screws than the bearing.  Once you start the twist the silicone's slipperyness facilitates the bearing's removal.
-For a bearing's long life it is important that it have good water lubrication, proper shaft alignment and the protruding shaft be no longer than 6" from stern tube to front of the prop hub.  Mine is still tight now on the shaft after 7 years.  Prior to this last installation, I made all three of the above mistakes, causing premature bearing failure.

Re the Spurs installation, Ed Marill of Siesta almost flooded his boat a few years ago when he hit a piece of wood that ripped the hull mounted Spurs piece out of the hull leaving the open screw holes.   Maybe a different shaft mounted line cutter would be a better choice.  We used one of the circular ones that fit over the shaft for many years with success and no leaks.

Dave
Formerly CSY 44 WT SV Soggy Paws 1 (Now under new ownership, located in Perth Australia)
Now St. Francis 44 MK II Catamaran, in Samal Island Philippines

11
Engines and Drive Train / Re: Perkins..408 overheating over 1500 rpm's
« on: February 21, 2016, 12:50:26 AM »
Another Way welcome to the list.  What is your name?

How long ago did this problem start and was it a sudden change or over a long while? 
How many hours on the engine since last complete overhaul.
Lots depends on your answers.

I would first start with the raw water cooling system and make sure you have the same flow now as you had when you didn't have the problem earlier.  If not, initially limit your search to inspecting every component in the raw water cooling system including the raw water injection elbow into the hot exhaust before the water muffler and a close look at the pump.  Have you made sure you don't have any blocked hoses between the seacock and muffler discharge?

If raw water out the exhaust is same as before look at internal cooling water system.  A good place to start is the thermostat which if stuck nearly closed would cause low RPM overheating.  If cooling water/coolant looking dirty/rusty try flushing entire system.  Also make sure pump is operating properly.

Once you are sure both these systems are working well it gets harder.  Look at the rest of the list including injectors, oil system etc. 

Pls let us  all know what you find.  Forget any expensive diesel mechanic who wants to tear the engine apart until you have looked at everything you can yourself.

Good Luck Dave

12
Interior / Re: Removing bronze portlight interior oval ring?
« on: February 06, 2016, 07:06:16 AM »
Doug,

We took all ours off about 18 years ago for cleaning, sealing and regasketing.  All were installed with white 3M 5200.  Some were relatively easy but a couple were near impossible.  The one I still remember is the one in our WT engine room which finally came out with with a lot of effort and a big crow bar.

Heat from a hot heat gun helps release the 5200 and there is also a 5200 release compound you can buy.  The problem with the release compound would be getting it to all the stuck joints.  I wouldn't put them back in with 5200.

We have replaced most of our old 1/4" oak paneling with either bare white painted hull in many cabinets, or in the case of the aft and fwd staterooms varnished wood strips.  This gives a nice finish to those large hull sides previously covered with oak ply.  If you want to have a look, see the interior pics on our Soggy Paws For Sale ad off the homepage on our website.

Dave

13
Systems / Re: Finished Refrigeration Overhaul
« on: December 22, 2015, 07:27:44 PM »
Richard,

It sounds like you will have a great refrig/feezer system.  Lots of insulation always helps. 

What compressor speed are your run times based on?  Remember to run the compressor at the lowest speed possible that will keep up with the heat load for maximum efficiency and lowest daily energy use.

We will be installing another one on our new cat soon.

Dave

14
Systems / Re: gasoline generator
« on: December 14, 2015, 09:51:47 AM »
Steve,

As Sherry indicated, we think the Honda is a much better choice for a generator than a permanently installed diesel one.   Diesel generators are expensive, take up more room, are not always reliable and are expensive and difficult to repair in the boonies.  Almost every small island with fishing boats has gasoline, no so with diesel.  And you can take a portable generator ashore if needed.

See this link on our website for more info on our setup:
http://www.svsoggypaws.com/electricalsystems.htm#honda

Dave

15
The SSCA Gam is being held this year at the Eau Gallie Civic Center 13-15 Nov.  The CSY breakfast will be Sat morning 14 Nov.
 
As in years past we will post a CSY Breakfast sign up sheet on Friday inside the SSCA Gam entrance doors.  Pls either let us know here on the forum or sign up on the sheet if you plan to come to the breakfast.  I need to have a fairly firm count so I can let Memaws know Friday night how many are coming Saturday morning.  They will have a table set up for us at 0700. 

We will be there from about 0700 until about 0830 having breakfast for anyone that wants to join us.  You don't need to go to the Gam if you come to the breakfast.   At this point we have about 10 people signed up.

Dave

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